Effect of Cochleovestibular Malformation on Surgical and Auditory Outcomes in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients: A Retrospective Study Using a Web-Based Database Purpose Prior studies have suggested that cochleovestibular malformation (CM) may have an influence on surgical and auditory outcomes in pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients. The present study aimed to use retrospective data to explore surgical and auditory outcomes in pediatric CI recipients with CM compared to pediatric CI recipients with ... Article
Article  |   September 21, 2016
Effect of Cochleovestibular Malformation on Surgical and Auditory Outcomes in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients: A Retrospective Study Using a Web-Based Database
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth McDonald
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
  • Kristin Gravel
    Lions Children's Hearing & ENT Clinic, University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital, Minneapolis, MN
  • Aparna Rao
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
  • Disclosure Financial: The authors received a financial contribution from the Lions MD5M Hearing Foundation. Kristin Gravel is an audiologist at the University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital. Aparna Rao is a clinical associate professor at Arizona State University.
    Disclosure Financial: The authors received a financial contribution from the Lions MD5M Hearing Foundation. Kristin Gravel is an audiologist at the University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital. Aparna Rao is a clinical associate professor at Arizona State University.×
  • Nonfinancial: Some of this information was presented in a poster at AudiologyNOW 2015. Aparna Rao is the coordinator of Special Interest Group 9, Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood.
    Nonfinancial: Some of this information was presented in a poster at AudiologyNOW 2015. Aparna Rao is the coordinator of Special Interest Group 9, Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood.×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Part 1
Article   |   September 21, 2016
Effect of Cochleovestibular Malformation on Surgical and Auditory Outcomes in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients: A Retrospective Study Using a Web-Based Database
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2016, Vol. 1, 37-48. doi:10.1044/persp1.9.37
History: Received March 23, 2016 , Revised July 22, 2016 , Accepted July 28, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2016, Vol. 1, 37-48. doi:10.1044/persp1.9.37
History: Received March 23, 2016; Revised July 22, 2016; Accepted July 28, 2016

Purpose Prior studies have suggested that cochleovestibular malformation (CM) may have an influence on surgical and auditory outcomes in pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients. The present study aimed to use retrospective data to explore surgical and auditory outcomes in pediatric CI recipients with CM compared to pediatric CI recipients with normal anatomy (NA) through the use of a secure, web-based database.

Method This study was completed through retrospective chart review using a database of pediatric patients with hearing loss (N=199) seen at a multidisciplinary clinic. The online database was populated with clinical data including imaging results, surgical and sensory device information, patient variables (e.g., age at onset of hearing loss, age at cochlear implantation), and aided speech perception results.

Results A higher rate of surgical complications was experienced by the group with CM (39%) than the group with NA (9%). No significant differences were noted between groups over time on performance of most speech perception tests. However, a difference between groups was observed when PB-K words (Haskins, 1949) were assessed over time, with children with NA performing 21% better on average than children with CM.

Conclusion Greater variability exists in performance outcomes for pediatric CI patients with CM than for those with normal inner ear anatomy. Implementation of a pediatric minimum speech test battery would improve the uniformity of test administration with and across programs, allowing for comparison of outcomes across CI centers.

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