A Review of the Expectations of Speech-Language Pathology Externship Student Clinicians and Their Supervisors Students bring skills gleaned from academic learning and any previous university clinic internship experiences to externship clinical placements. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in their personal work settings share their caseload, supervise, and guide these novice professionals as they advance their clinical skills in preparation for independent practice. Supervisors and student clinicians ... Article
Article  |   December 15, 2016
A Review of the Expectations of Speech-Language Pathology Externship Student Clinicians and Their Supervisors
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne Nicole Wunk Christodoulou
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Elmira College, Elmira, NY
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Joanne Nicole Wunk Christodoulou has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Joanne Nicole Wunk Christodoulou has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Joanne Nicole Wunk Christodoulou has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Joanne Nicole Wunk Christodoulou has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Part 2
Article   |   December 15, 2016
A Review of the Expectations of Speech-Language Pathology Externship Student Clinicians and Their Supervisors
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 42-53. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG11.42
History: Received April 16, 2016 , Revised July 19, 2016 , Accepted July 25, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 42-53. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG11.42
History: Received April 16, 2016; Revised July 19, 2016; Accepted July 25, 2016

Students bring skills gleaned from academic learning and any previous university clinic internship experiences to externship clinical placements. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in their personal work settings share their caseload, supervise, and guide these novice professionals as they advance their clinical skills in preparation for independent practice. Supervisors and student clinicians with varying skills, goals, and previous supervision experiences have expectations for these final placements that can impact the effectiveness of the supervisory relationship and experience. Educational theories indicate that a strong supervisory relationship is built on practices of modeling, active listening, and facilitative learning as students mature toward independent evidence-based practices and decisions, with supervisors that offer constructive feedback and encouragement. Supervisors should work to create an atmosphere that fosters trust and openness to promote the most effective supervisory relationship with their supervisees. An important component of an effective working relationship is to be aware of expectations and a willingness to adapt to varying and/or changing expectations. Increasing understanding of expectations will create an opportunity to exchange information and build a strong, effective supervisory relationship. An awareness of students' expectations and perceptions allows supervisors to target the students' needs and personalize guidance to facilitate maximum growth in clinical skills.

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