The Development and Impact of a University-Based Dysphagia Research Clinic in the Education of Graduate Students Across settings, an increasing number of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are evaluating and treating dysphagia in patients of all ages. For many students, though, there are few opportunities in an academic setting to apply the knowledge learned in coursework and to develop the hands-on skills needed to become competent clinicians in ... Article
Article  |   August 12, 2016
The Development and Impact of a University-Based Dysphagia Research Clinic in the Education of Graduate Students
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elise M. Wagner
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Teachers College of Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Georgia A. Malandraki
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures×
  • Financial: The authors have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: The authors have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: The authors have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: The authors have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. ×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Part 3
Article   |   August 12, 2016
The Development and Impact of a University-Based Dysphagia Research Clinic in the Education of Graduate Students
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2016, Vol. 1, 113-121. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG13.113
History: Received May 14, 2016 , Revised May 17, 2016 , Accepted May 19, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2016, Vol. 1, 113-121. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG13.113
History: Received May 14, 2016; Revised May 17, 2016; Accepted May 19, 2016

Across settings, an increasing number of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are evaluating and treating dysphagia in patients of all ages. For many students, though, there are few opportunities in an academic setting to apply the knowledge learned in coursework and to develop the hands-on skills needed to become competent clinicians in dysphagia management. For this reason, our team developed a prototype Dysphagia Research Clinic (DRC) at Teachers College of Columbia University. This article summarizes the steps and processes that were completed to establish a specialized in-house DRC within an academic (non-medical based) setting. We begin with a review of the expertise needed, licensure and safety requirements, equipment, space and staffing needs, as well as legal considerations. Then, data on the educational impact of the program on students are presented. Our aim is to provide guidance for other graduate programs that are interested and invested in establishing a similar initiative.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank all other extraordinary DRC faculty, including Justine Joan Sheppard, PhD., CCC-SLP, BCS-S, Bernadine Gagnon, M.S., CCC-SLP, Kathleen Youse, PhD., CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS, and Chandra Ivey, MD; DRC research assistants Cagla Kantarcigil, Akila Rajappa, Avi Mishra, Cindy Alves, Kristine Kang, and Andrew Angeles for their help with organizational aspects of the clinic; the participating students and the patients and their caregivers. We are also grateful to Professor Steve Silverman for his guidance on statistical analysis.
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