Creating a Culturally-Responsive Speech and Language Program in a Tribal Community This article describes the development of a culturally responsive speech and language program for the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community (CTGR) of Oregon. The historical context that served as a foundation for the speech and language program is first discussed. Next, a description of what constitutes a culturally-based ... Article
Article  |   August 09, 2016
Creating a Culturally-Responsive Speech and Language Program in a Tribal Community
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarah Ross
    Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Health and Wellness Center, Grand Ronde, OR
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures×
  • Financial: The author has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: The author has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: The author has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: The author has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Part 2
Article   |   August 09, 2016
Creating a Culturally-Responsive Speech and Language Program in a Tribal Community
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2016, Vol. 1, 69-80. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG14.69
History: Received April 1, 2016 , Revised June 18, 2016 , Accepted June 18, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2016, Vol. 1, 69-80. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG14.69
History: Received April 1, 2016; Revised June 18, 2016; Accepted June 18, 2016

This article describes the development of a culturally responsive speech and language program for the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community (CTGR) of Oregon. The historical context that served as a foundation for the speech and language program is first discussed. Next, a description of what constitutes a culturally-based program is presented. The specific culturally responsive attributes of the CTGR program are then elucidated followed by recommendations for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) desiring to create Tribal speech and language programs. In addition, insights presented in the article can provide guidance, more generally, for SLPs who currently serve Tribal communities through existing programs.

Acknowledgements
This project was supported by the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. Hayu masi (“many thanks”) to the CTGR Tribal Council for their belief in the value of this important work and to each of the Tribal families I have had the honor to learn from as we engaged in communication treatment. Thank you to my colleagues from Portland State University who provided insight and expertise that greatly assisted in the initial stages of this project, especially Dr. Lynn Fox and Dr. Shelley Chabon. I raise my hands to Dr. Ella Inglebret for her kindness and patience through the years as one of my strongest supporters. Her advocacy and encouragement has inspired me to reach further and transform into the clinician and researcher that I was meant to become. Hayu masi pus kanawi ikta mayka munk (“I am grateful for all that you do”)—Dr. Eirik Thorsgard, Dr. David Lewis, and Dr. Kara Medeiros for their academic, historical, cultural, and spiritual perspectives without which this work would be incomplete. And to my family, my grandfather, John Pichette Jr., who connected me to my Native roots; my parents Robert and Kelly Nelson who laid the foundation of fulfillment found in serving others; my children Dakota and Madison who show me why I do what I do; my husband, Dustin, who dances with me through every adventure; and my Ancestors who made it all possible. nayka q'at m'tsayka (“I love you all”).
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