Differentiated Instruction: A Culturally-Congruent Practice A differentiated instructional approach is being advocated by leaders in education for meeting the needs of learners from diverse backgrounds who demonstrate varying abilities, strengths, and interests. Differentiated instruction (DI) is not a new idea and has a long, rich history of use in Native communities. This article describes the ... Article
Article  |   August 12, 2016
Differentiated Instruction: A Culturally-Congruent Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ella Inglebret
    Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, Washington State University, Spokane, WA
  • Susan Rae Banks-Joseph
    Department of Teaching & Learning, Washington State University, Pullman, WA
  • CHiXapkaid
    Tuwaduq Cultural & Research Institute, Skokomish, WA
  • Kaid'dub Pavel
    Tuwaduq Cultural & Research Institute, Skokomish, WA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures×
  • Financial: The authors have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: The authors have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: The authors have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: The authors have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Part 2
Article   |   August 12, 2016
Differentiated Instruction: A Culturally-Congruent Practice
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2016, Vol. 1, 43-55. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG14.43
History: Received April 1, 2016 , Revised May 31, 2016 , Accepted June 3, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2016, Vol. 1, 43-55. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG14.43
History: Received April 1, 2016; Revised May 31, 2016; Accepted June 3, 2016

A differentiated instructional approach is being advocated by leaders in education for meeting the needs of learners from diverse backgrounds who demonstrate varying abilities, strengths, and interests. Differentiated instruction (DI) is not a new idea and has a long, rich history of use in Native communities. This article describes the components of DI derived from a three-year curriculum design project, Honoring Tribal Legacies: An Epic Journey of Healing (CHiXapkaid, Inglebret, & Wood, 2014a, 2014b), sponsored by the National Park Service. As part of this project, PreK-12 curriculum materials were designed in a collaborative effort involving tribal and non-tribal educators including a speech-language pathologist (SLP), tribal elders, and representatives of a range of disciplines. The curriculum materials were analyzed to identify underlying themes and associated educational and intervention strategies. Overall, results of this analysis demonstrate how a DI approach aligns with incorporating tribal perspectives into the content, processes, and products of elementary and secondary level curriculum. As members of educational teams, SLPs can play an active role in working with teachers to use culturally-based DI. In this way, we can foster an educational environment that enhances students' beliefs in their capacities to comprehend, learn about, and become active participants in the world around them. To illustrate this, we end with the perspective of Kaid'dub Pavel, a ninth grade student with a profound, bilateral hearing loss and a cochlear implant. Kaid'dub shares his insights into DI, as it relates to his traditional cultural education.

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