Guest Editor's Column Clinical work with adults with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) can be fun, challenging, frustrating, and rewarding. The factors that contribute to these characteristics are as heterogeneous as the patients themselves: Research in RHD has its own challenges and rewards in addition to all of the reasons stated above. ... Editorial
Editorial  |   July 12, 2016
Guest Editor's Column
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Part 2
Editorial   |   July 12, 2016
Guest Editor's Column
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, July 2016, Vol. 1, 62. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG2.62
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, July 2016, Vol. 1, 62. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG2.62
Clinical work with adults with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) can be fun, challenging, frustrating, and rewarding. The factors that contribute to these characteristics are as heterogeneous as the patients themselves:
Research in RHD has its own challenges and rewards in addition to all of the reasons stated above. There are many questions to be asked and answered about the nature of the deficits, how best to assess them, and of course, what treatments are the most effective and efficient. Convincing others (including funding agencies) that the questions are important and the answers can have meaningful impact on patients and families is challenging. Recruiting participants, always a time-consuming task in any clinical research, is even more difficult when the people you're trying to recruit are not aware of their deficits.
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