Clinical Decision Making for the Internationally Adopted Child With Cleft Lip and Palate Many children with orofacial clefts are adopted each year into English-speaking families in the United States. These children present unique challenges for achieving best practice in treatment delivery due to a variety of issues. Often, children experience delays in management of their cleft and have a high risk for impaired ... Article
Article  |   June 10, 2016
Clinical Decision Making for the Internationally Adopted Child With Cleft Lip and Palate
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy Morgan
    Shriners Hospitals for Children—Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Mary O'Gara
    Shriners Hospitals for Children—Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Meredith Albert
    Shriners Hospitals for Children—Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Kathleen Kapp-Simon
    Shriners Hospitals for Children—Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Amy Morgan, Mary O'Gara, Meredith Albert, and Kathleen Kapp-Simon are employed by Shriners Hospitals for Children—Chicago and work on the Cleft Palate/Craniofacial team. This work was supported by Shriners Hospitals for Children under grant # 71004-CHI (Kapp-Simon, PI).
    Financial: Amy Morgan, Mary O'Gara, Meredith Albert, and Kathleen Kapp-Simon are employed by Shriners Hospitals for Children—Chicago and work on the Cleft Palate/Craniofacial team. This work was supported by Shriners Hospitals for Children under grant # 71004-CHI (Kapp-Simon, PI).×
  • Nonfinancial: Amy Morgan, Mary O'Gara, Meredith Albert, and Kathleen Kapp-Simon have previously published in this subject area, some of these are cited in this work.
    Nonfinancial: Amy Morgan, Mary O'Gara, Meredith Albert, and Kathleen Kapp-Simon have previously published in this subject area, some of these are cited in this work.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / International & Global / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 1
Article   |   June 10, 2016
Clinical Decision Making for the Internationally Adopted Child With Cleft Lip and Palate
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2016, Vol. 1, 27-39. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG5.27
History: Received February 20, 2016 , Revised April 18, 2016 , Accepted April 24, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2016, Vol. 1, 27-39. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG5.27
History: Received February 20, 2016; Revised April 18, 2016; Accepted April 24, 2016

Many children with orofacial clefts are adopted each year into English-speaking families in the United States. These children present unique challenges for achieving best practice in treatment delivery due to a variety of issues. Often, children experience delays in management of their cleft and have a high risk for impaired speech development as a result. Practitioners need to allow time for the child to learn high pressure consonants of English after palatal repair, without overlooking a persistent structural deficit that could be responsible for impairment of that learning. Additionally, children are immersed in a novel language while often completely removed from their native language, creating difficulty with knowing when and how to best identify true language disorder compared to second language learning issues. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the relevant literature pertaining to these issues and offer concrete guidelines for speech-language pathologists who encounter children with orofacial clefts who are internationally adopted.

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