Feeding and Swallowing Issues in Infants With Craniofacial Anomalies The problems with feeding and swallowing that occur as a result of clefts and craniofacial anomalies range in severity. The extent of clefting, as well as other structural, airway, and neurologic issues, are factors that contribute to potential difficulty with oral feeding mechanics and with the integrity of airway protection ... Article
Article  |   June 10, 2016
Feeding and Swallowing Issues in Infants With Craniofacial Anomalies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Claire Kane Miller
    Aerodigestive and Esophageal Center & Division of Speech-Language Pathology Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
  • Lauren L. Madhoun
    Department of Speech Pathology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Claire Kane Miller is employed by Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center. Lauren L. Madhoun is employed by Nationwide Children's Hospital
    Financial: Claire Kane Miller is employed by Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center. Lauren L. Madhoun is employed by Nationwide Children's Hospital×
  • Nonfinancial: Claire Kane Miller and Lauren L. Madhoun have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Claire Kane Miller and Lauren L. Madhoun have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Part 1
Article   |   June 10, 2016
Feeding and Swallowing Issues in Infants With Craniofacial Anomalies
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2016, Vol. 1, 13-26. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG5.13
History: Received February 3, 2016 , Revised April 13, 2016 , Accepted April 24, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2016, Vol. 1, 13-26. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG5.13
History: Received February 3, 2016; Revised April 13, 2016; Accepted April 24, 2016

The problems with feeding and swallowing that occur as a result of clefts and craniofacial anomalies range in severity. The extent of clefting, as well as other structural, airway, and neurologic issues, are factors that contribute to potential difficulty with oral feeding mechanics and with the integrity of airway protection during swallowing. Oral motor dysfunction in conjunction with obstruction in the upper airway secondary to anatomic or physiologic anomalies has the potential to cause serious disruption to the necessary coordination of respiration and swallowing. Timely identification of problems is necessary to address threats to nutritional status and/or respiratory health. The pediatric speech-language pathologist has a primary role in the clinical assessment of oral motor/feeding skills, and in the recognition of clinical signs and symptoms of swallowing dysfunction that may warrant referral for instrumental assessment of swallowing function and airway protection. The objective of this article is to summarize the potential feeding difficulties and feeding strategy options for patients with Craniofacial Microsomia, 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, Treacher Collins Syndrome, and Pierre Robin Sequence. Awareness of the factors that impact upon the success of feeding and the efficacy of compensatory feeding strategies is key to best practice and successful patient outcomes.

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