Speech Sound Disorders: What's Motor Got To Do With It? Speech sound disorders (SSDs) are commonly viewed as involving impaired articulation and/or phonological skills. Speech language pathologists working with individuals with (SSDs) assess the articulation of speech sounds and the coordination of articulatory structures with other components of the speech mechanism, including the phonatory, respiratory, and resonatory subsystems. The sound ... Article
Article  |   June 14, 2016
Speech Sound Disorders: What's Motor Got To Do With It?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maria I. Grigos
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, New York, NY
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: This research was partially supported by funding from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders Grant R03DC009079 and from the Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America.
    Financial: This research was partially supported by funding from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders Grant R03DC009079 and from the Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America.×
  • Nonfinancial: The author has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: The author has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 2
Article   |   June 14, 2016
Speech Sound Disorders: What's Motor Got To Do With It?
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2016, Vol. 1, 75-87. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG1.75
History: Received October 15, 2015 , Revised December 15, 2015 , Accepted February 12, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2016, Vol. 1, 75-87. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG1.75
History: Received October 15, 2015; Revised December 15, 2015; Accepted February 12, 2016

Speech sound disorders (SSDs) are commonly viewed as involving impaired articulation and/or phonological skills. Speech language pathologists working with individuals with (SSDs) assess the articulation of speech sounds and the coordination of articulatory structures with other components of the speech mechanism, including the phonatory, respiratory, and resonatory subsystems. The sound system of the language and the rules that govern how phonemes are combined are equally critical for clinicians to explore. While the terms “articulation” and “phonology” provide clinicians with a framework for classification, children who are broadly identified with (SSDs) may also display characteristics of a motor speech impairment, which can obscure the decision making process with respect to both diagnosis and treatment. One such motor speech disorder is childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). The focus of this paper is to discuss motor speech deficits in children and to review research that aims to distinguish motor speech patterns in children with (SSDs) with and without CAS. We will also address the relationship between emerging speech motor and linguistic skills.

Acknowledgements
The authors would like to acknowledge the following students and colleagues who have contributed to this work: Julie Case, Hailey Small, Aviva Moss, Ying Lu, Christina Reuterskiöld, Rupal Patel, Nicole Kolenda, Panagiota Tampakis, Penelope Elias, Jessica Storer, Lauren Perry, Deborah Hayden, Jennifer Eigen, John Saxman, Andrew Gordon.
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