Role of Hypodermoclysis in Clinical Care The replacement of fluids (usually water), may be undertaken in one of three ways: orally: People may drink it or it may be administered via an enteral tube; intravenously where fluid is provided via a cannula into a vein; or subcutaneously, where fluids are ... Article
Article  |   June 14, 2016
Role of Hypodermoclysis in Clinical Care
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Smithard
    Electronics and Digital Arts, University of Kent, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
    King's College Hospital, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • Paula Leslie
    Communication Science and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: The authors have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: The authors have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: The authors have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: The authors have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Part 2
Article   |   June 14, 2016
Role of Hypodermoclysis in Clinical Care
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2016, Vol. 1, 81-88. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG13.81
History: Received July 31, 2015 , Revised November 3, 2015 , Accepted January 20, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2016, Vol. 1, 81-88. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG13.81
History: Received July 31, 2015; Revised November 3, 2015; Accepted January 20, 2016

The replacement of fluids (usually water), may be undertaken in one of three ways:

  • orally: People may drink it or it may be administered via an enteral tube;

  • intravenously where fluid is provided via a cannula into a vein; or

  • subcutaneously, where fluids are administered between the subcutaneous layer of the skin and fat. This is called hypodermoclysis.

As speech-language pathologists (SLPs) monitor the ability to swallow, they are in an ideal position, particularly in community settings, to identify problems with hydration. People with dysphagia may require a modification to their diet. Fluids are frequently thickened, which then results in reduction of fluid (water) intake. When the amount of water drunk is exceeded by the amount of water lost (e.g., urine, feces, sweat, and breath) dehydration may result. Clinically, dehydration may present as agitation, dry skin and tongue (mouth), and reduced skin elasticity.

Hypodermoclysis is a simple technique that can be used in the community with minimal training and can be used to supplement oral intake. The SLP is ideally placed to suggest this to the physician caring for the patient.

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