Does Excessive Attention to Speech Contribute to Stuttering? A Preliminary Study With a Reading Comprehension Task People who stutter (PWS) presumably pay excessive attention to monitoring their speech, possibly exacerbating speech fluency. Using a reading comprehension task, we investigated whether or not PWS devote excessive attention to their speech. Methods Eleven PWS and 11 people who do not stutter (PNS) read passages in silent and ... Article
Article  |   April 22, 2016
Does Excessive Attention to Speech Contribute to Stuttering? A Preliminary Study With a Reading Comprehension Task
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daichi Iimura
    Graduate School of Informatics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
  • Shintaro Uehara
    Center for Information and Neural Networks (CiNet), National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Osaka, Japan
    The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan
  • Shinji Yamamoto
    School of Health and Sport Sciences, Osaka University of Health and Sport Sciences, Osaka, Japan
  • Tsuyoshi Aihara
    Faculty of Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi, Japan
  • Keisuke Kushiro
    Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Daichi Iimura, Shintaro Uehara, Shinji Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi Aihara, and Keisuke Kushiro have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Daichi Iimura, Shintaro Uehara, Shinji Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi Aihara, and Keisuke Kushiro have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Daichi Iimura, Shintaro Uehara, Shinji Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi Aihara, and Keisuke Kushiro have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose
    Nonfinancial: Daichi Iimura, Shintaro Uehara, Shinji Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi Aihara, and Keisuke Kushiro have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Part 1
Article   |   April 22, 2016
Does Excessive Attention to Speech Contribute to Stuttering? A Preliminary Study With a Reading Comprehension Task
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, April 2016, Vol. 1, 5-15. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG4.5
History: Received September 11, 2015 , Revised February 18, 2016 , Accepted February 18, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, April 2016, Vol. 1, 5-15. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG4.5
History: Received September 11, 2015; Revised February 18, 2016; Accepted February 18, 2016

People who stutter (PWS) presumably pay excessive attention to monitoring their speech, possibly exacerbating speech fluency. Using a reading comprehension task, we investigated whether or not PWS devote excessive attention to their speech.

Methods Eleven PWS and 11 people who do not stutter (PNS) read passages in silent and oral reading conditions with and without noise masking, then answered comprehension questions. For PWS, auditory noise masking and silent reading would presumably divert their attention away from their speech.

Results The comprehension performance of PWS was lower in the oral-no-masking condition than the oral-masking and silent-no-masking conditions. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the comprehension performance of PNS between the four conditions.

Conclusions PWS had poor comprehension when listening to their speech, suggesting excessive attention to speech and limited attention to concurrent cognitive tasks.

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