Intensifying English Vocabulary Instruction for English Language Learners English vocabulary development is a key component of language and literacy development for English language learners (ELLs) living in the United States. With the increase in the number of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) with ELLs on their caseloads, it has become increasingly important for SLPs to be able to facilitate vocabulary ... Article
Article  |   March 31, 2016
Intensifying English Vocabulary Instruction for English Language Learners
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa Fitton
    Department of Communication Science & Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Kristina Nichole Bustamante
    Department of Communication Science & Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Mary Claire Wofford
    Department of Communication Science & Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Dana Brown
    Department of Communication Science & Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Clariebelle Gabas
    Department of Communication Science & Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Rachel Hoge
    Department of Communication Science & Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Carla Wood
    Department of Communication Science & Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Disclosures: Financial: Lisa Fitton was supported by Predoctoral Interdisciplinary Research Fellowship, funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Kristina Nichole Bustamante, Mary Claire Wofford, Dana Brown, and Clariebelle Gabas were supported by the Bilingual Oral Language and Literacy Development & Disorders grant, funded by the U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs (H325D140068). Views expressed herein are those of the authors and have neither been reviewed nor approved by the granting agencies. Rachel Hoge and Carla Wood have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosures: Financial: Lisa Fitton was supported by Predoctoral Interdisciplinary Research Fellowship, funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Kristina Nichole Bustamante, Mary Claire Wofford, Dana Brown, and Clariebelle Gabas were supported by the Bilingual Oral Language and Literacy Development & Disorders grant, funded by the U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs (H325D140068). Views expressed herein are those of the authors and have neither been reviewed nor approved by the granting agencies. Rachel Hoge and Carla Wood have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Lisa Fitton, Kristina Nichole Bustamante, Mary Claire Wofford, Dana Brown, Clariebelle Gabas, Rachel Hoge, and Carla Wood have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Lisa Fitton, Kristina Nichole Bustamante, Mary Claire Wofford, Dana Brown, Clariebelle Gabas, Rachel Hoge, and Carla Wood have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Part 1
Article   |   March 31, 2016
Intensifying English Vocabulary Instruction for English Language Learners
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 4-14. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG16.4
History: Received November 1, 2015 , Revised December 4, 2015 , Accepted December 13, 2015
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 4-14. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG16.4
History: Received November 1, 2015; Revised December 4, 2015; Accepted December 13, 2015

English vocabulary development is a key component of language and literacy development for English language learners (ELLs) living in the United States. With the increase in the number of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) with ELLs on their caseloads, it has become increasingly important for SLPs to be able to facilitate vocabulary growth in ELLs. To assist SLPs working with ELLs in schools, the present paper provides an overview of strategies to enhance English vocabulary instruction for ELLs, drawing on evidence from research with both monolingual and bilingual students. Strategies included are: leveraging the native language, teaching comprehension monitoring, embedding instruction in reading, building morphological awareness, and collaborating with classroom teachers. Specific, effective vocabulary instruction protocols are also briefly overviewed.

Acknowledgements
The first author was supported by Predoctoral Interdisciplinary Research Fellowship, funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education (186000-520-025833). The second through fifth authors were supported by the Bilingual Oral Language and Literacy Development & Disorders grant, funded by the U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs (H325D140068). Views expressed herein are those of the authors and have neither been reviewed nor approved by the granting agencies.
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