Integrating Written Text and Graphic Cues Into Peer-Mediated Interventions: Effects on Reciprocal Social Communication Skills A growing body of evidence has supported the use of peer-mediated interventions to increase the social-communication skills of students with a variety of developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Despite these promising results, however, many practitioners may struggle to effectively implement peer-mediated interventions across the diverse presentation and skill ... Article
Article  |   March 31, 2016
Integrating Written Text and Graphic Cues Into Peer-Mediated Interventions: Effects on Reciprocal Social Communication Skills
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Todd M. Miller
    Juniper Gardens Children's Project, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS
  • Kathy Thiemann-Bourque
    Juniper Gardens Children's Project, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS
  • Financial Disclosure: Todd M. Miller is a graduate research assistant at the University of Kansas. Kathy Thiemann-Bourque is an associate research professor at the University of Kansas.
    Financial Disclosure: Todd M. Miller is a graduate research assistant at the University of Kansas. Kathy Thiemann-Bourque is an associate research professor at the University of Kansas.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Todd M. Miller has previously published in the subject area. Kathy Thiemann-Bourque has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Todd M. Miller has previously published in the subject area. Kathy Thiemann-Bourque has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Part 1
Article   |   March 31, 2016
Integrating Written Text and Graphic Cues Into Peer-Mediated Interventions: Effects on Reciprocal Social Communication Skills
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 20-28. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG1.20
History: Received September 1, 2015 , Revised November 25, 2015 , Accepted November 30, 2015
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 20-28. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG1.20
History: Received September 1, 2015; Revised November 25, 2015; Accepted November 30, 2015

A growing body of evidence has supported the use of peer-mediated interventions to increase the social-communication skills of students with a variety of developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Despite these promising results, however, many practitioners may struggle to effectively implement peer-mediated interventions across the diverse presentation and skill profiles of students with ASD, specifically in accommodating the unique language and communication needs of their students. This article presents an example of integrating written-graphic and text cues into a peer-mediated intervention for three elementary-age students with ASD. Emphasis is placed on describing the teaching procedures used to encourage students with ASD and peers to participate in shared games and activities together, using written-graphic and text cues to support appropriate social communication. Additionally, strategies for selecting and including typically-developing peers to participate in social skills programming are reviewed. Data collected throughout the peer-mediated intervention demonstrates the positive effect of systematic social skills instruction for both students with disabilities and their peers.

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