Computer-Based Treatments for Aphasia: Advancing Clinical Practice and Research A growing body of literature has investigated the efficacy of computer-based treatments for people with aphasia. In this narrative review, we describe a representative sample of 12 studies that were selected from a survey of the literature including a search of PubMed and PsychInfo online databases, using the key words ... Article
Article  |   March 31, 2016
Computer-Based Treatments for Aphasia: Advancing Clinical Practice and Research
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jaime B. Lee
    Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Leora R. Cherney
    Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Financial Disclosure: Jaime B. Lee is a research speech-language pathologist at the Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Leora R. Cherney is a Senior Research Scientist and Director of the Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and Professor of both Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Communication Sciences and Disorders at Northwestern University. The contents of this manuscript were developed under a grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90IF0034 to LRC). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this manuscript do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.
    Financial Disclosure: Jaime B. Lee is a research speech-language pathologist at the Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Leora R. Cherney is a Senior Research Scientist and Director of the Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and Professor of both Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Communication Sciences and Disorders at Northwestern University. The contents of this manuscript were developed under a grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90IF0034 to LRC). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this manuscript do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jaime B. Lee has previously published in the subject area. Leora R. Cherney has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jaime B. Lee has previously published in the subject area. Leora R. Cherney has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Part 1
Article   |   March 31, 2016
Computer-Based Treatments for Aphasia: Advancing Clinical Practice and Research
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 5-17. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG2.5
History: Received September 2, 2015 , Revised December 11, 2015 , Accepted January 22, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 5-17. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG2.5
History: Received September 2, 2015; Revised December 11, 2015; Accepted January 22, 2016

A growing body of literature has investigated the efficacy of computer-based treatments for people with aphasia. In this narrative review, we describe a representative sample of 12 studies that were selected from a survey of the literature including a search of PubMed and PsychInfo online databases, using the key words “computer” and “aphasia” in the title and abstract fields. The sample illustrates a range of research designs, experimental interventions targeting various language modalities and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) domains, and outcomes. We discuss the clinical and research advantages and limitations of computer-based treatment, as well as the benefits to persons with aphasia. We also highlight the role of the clinician in critically evaluating computerized treatments, identifying the active ingredients of the intervention, and ensuring that tasks are appropriate for their clients with aphasia.

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