A Review of Computer-Based Cognitive Training for Individuals With Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease Computer-based cognitive training programs are increasing in popularity, not only due to trends in technological advances, but also due to the intense marketing campaigns of such programs toward late-middle-aged and older adults. This article's objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of computer-based cognitive training programs in maintaining or improving cognitive ... Article
Article  |   March 31, 2016
A Review of Computer-Based Cognitive Training for Individuals With Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kimberly D. Mueller
    Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
  • Financial Disclosure: Kimberly D. Mueller is a speech-language pathologist at the Wisconsin's Alzheimer's Institute and a doctoral student in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    Financial Disclosure: Kimberly D. Mueller is a speech-language pathologist at the Wisconsin's Alzheimer's Institute and a doctoral student in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Kimberly D. Mueller has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Kimberly D. Mueller has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Part 1
Article   |   March 31, 2016
A Review of Computer-Based Cognitive Training for Individuals With Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 47-61. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG2.47
History: Received September 14, 2015 , Revised December 22, 2015 , Accepted January 22, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 47-61. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG2.47
History: Received September 14, 2015; Revised December 22, 2015; Accepted January 22, 2016

Computer-based cognitive training programs are increasing in popularity, not only due to trends in technological advances, but also due to the intense marketing campaigns of such programs toward late-middle-aged and older adults. This article's objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of computer-based cognitive training programs in maintaining or improving cognitive function in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD). Twelve databases were searched using terms related to computerized cognitive training (CCT) and MCI and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Two raters independently extracted articles using agreed-upon criteria. Due to the heterogeneity of the samples, interventions, and outcomes, data of the studies was not statistically pooled for meta-analysis. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria and the findings were summarized. All of the studies reviewed provided support that computerized cognitive interventions are feasible in people with MCI or early-stage AD. None of the studies yielded significant evidence to support the use of CCT alone for improvement or maintenance of cognitive function in people with MCI or AD. Further, no studies presented significant evidence of transfer of training to everyday skills and tasks. Recommendations for evaluating products and for areas of research need are provided.

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