Computer-Based Cognitive Rehabilitation for Individuals With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review Purpose The purpose of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of computer-based cognitive rehabilitation (CCR) for improving cognitive and cognitive-communication skills in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Method A systematic search using key words related to CCR and TBI was conducted in 11 databases. Studies investigating ... Article
Article  |   March 31, 2016
Computer-Based Cognitive Rehabilitation for Individuals With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adam M. Politis
    Rehabilitation Medicine Department, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
  • Rocío S. Norman
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
  • Financial Disclosure: Adam M. Politis is a Predoctoral Intramural Research Training Award Fellow in the Rehabilitation Medicine Department at the National Institutes of Health. Adam M. Politis and Rocío S. Norman are doctoral students in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This research was supported in part by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, the National Institute on Child Health and Human Development (under award number R01HD071089), and the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences (under award number R25GMO83252). The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Health and Human Services, or the United States government.
    Financial Disclosure: Adam M. Politis is a Predoctoral Intramural Research Training Award Fellow in the Rehabilitation Medicine Department at the National Institutes of Health. Adam M. Politis and Rocío S. Norman are doctoral students in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This research was supported in part by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, the National Institute on Child Health and Human Development (under award number R01HD071089), and the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences (under award number R25GMO83252). The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Health and Human Services, or the United States government.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Adam M. Politis and Rocío S. Norman have previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Adam M. Politis and Rocío S. Norman have previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Part 1
Article   |   March 31, 2016
Computer-Based Cognitive Rehabilitation for Individuals With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 18-46. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG2.18
History: Received November 6, 2015 , Accepted January 22, 2016 , Revised December 1, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 18-46. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG2.18
History: Received November 6, 2015; Accepted January 22, 2016; Revised December 1, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of computer-based cognitive rehabilitation (CCR) for improving cognitive and cognitive-communication skills in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Method A systematic search using key words related to CCR and TBI was conducted in 11 databases. Studies investigating CCR in children, adolescents, and adults with TBI were identified using a set of predetermined clinical questions, inclusion/exclusion criteria, and search parameters. Studies were evaluated for methodological quality according to American Academy of Neurology guidelines (AAN, 2011).

Results Thirteen studies were included in this review. One study was classified as AAN Class II and 12 were rated as AAN Class III. Results across studies were inconsistent. In addition, studies contained a range of limitations that reduced the confidence of the reported findings.

Conclusion At this time, there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the efficacy of CCR in improving the cognitive or cognitive-communication skills of individuals with TBI. Additional, high-quality research is needed to determine if individuals with TBI will benefit from CCR. Until this occurs, clinicians are encouraged to review existing expert recommendations and engage in practice-based evidence to determine if CCR is appropriate for their individual clients with TBI.

Acknowledgements
The authors would like to thank Rebecca Politis, M.S., CCC-SLP for her assistance in preparing this article.
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