Basic Science: The Foundation of Evidence-Based Voice Therapy Basic science research is part of the circle of translational research that provides the scientific underpinning for evidence-based practice. The translation from bench to bedside, however, is sometimes not obvious. This short review seeks to demonstrate ways in which basic science can inform our clinical practice as voice therapists. From ... Article
Article  |   March 31, 2016
Basic Science: The Foundation of Evidence-Based Voice Therapy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aaron M. Johnson
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL
  • Disclosures: Financial: Aaron Johnson has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosures: Financial: Aaron Johnson has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Aaron Johnson has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Aaron Johnson has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 1
Article   |   March 31, 2016
Basic Science: The Foundation of Evidence-Based Voice Therapy
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 7-13. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG3.7
History: Received August 7, 2015 , Accepted August 31, 2015
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 7-13. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG3.7
History: Received August 7, 2015; Accepted August 31, 2015

Basic science research is part of the circle of translational research that provides the scientific underpinning for evidence-based practice. The translation from bench to bedside, however, is sometimes not obvious. This short review seeks to demonstrate ways in which basic science can inform our clinical practice as voice therapists. From in vitro molecular and cellular studies to in vivo animal models, basic science can investigate biological mechanisms of vocal health, such as vocal fold hydration, and voice use, such as voice rest and vocal exercise, in ways that are impossible in human clinical studies. Knowledge of these mechanisms inform and guide our clinical investigations and help provide evidence for behavioral voice therapy.

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