Emerging Scientist: Examining Exercise-Based Therapies for Voice and Swallow Disorders With a Neuroplastic Eye Exercise-based therapies are currently used to treat voice and swallow disorders without a clear understanding of the mechanisms that alter the cranial neuromuscular system. The recent application of principles of neuroplasticity to rehabilitation has revolutionized how we think about treatment, highlighting the need for change in both behavior and neural ... Article
Article  |   March 31, 2016
Emerging Scientist: Examining Exercise-Based Therapies for Voice and Swallow Disorders With a Neuroplastic Eye
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Allison J. Schaser
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
  • Disclosure: Financial: Allison Schaser has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Allison Schaser has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: General findings described in this manuscript were presented at various conferences in 2014 and 2015.
    Nonfinancial: General findings described in this manuscript were presented at various conferences in 2014 and 2015.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 1
Article   |   March 31, 2016
Emerging Scientist: Examining Exercise-Based Therapies for Voice and Swallow Disorders With a Neuroplastic Eye
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 33-38. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG3.33
History: Received July 23, 2015 , Revised September 10, 2015 , Accepted September 11, 2015
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2016, Vol. 1, 33-38. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG3.33
History: Received July 23, 2015; Revised September 10, 2015; Accepted September 11, 2015

Exercise-based therapies are currently used to treat voice and swallow disorders without a clear understanding of the mechanisms that alter the cranial neuromuscular system. The recent application of principles of neuroplasticity to rehabilitation has revolutionized how we think about treatment, highlighting the need for change in both behavior and neural substrates to create lasting benefits. It is difficult, however, to study neural substrates in human patients while controlling for factors that may influence plasticity, such as genetic and environmental differences. The use of a rat model allows these controls. My research aims to further our understanding of the neuroplastic potential of exercise in the cranial sensorimotor system with the ultimate long-term and future goal of guiding care of individuals with voice and swallow problems.

This work is significant because it examines the neuroplastic potential of exercise in the cranial sensorimotor system in both muscle and the central nervous system, along with the enduring effects of exercise with the long-term and future goal of using my results to guide current therapy timelines and protocols used in clinical populations with voice and swallow problems.

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